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Jesus: a different kind of king

Morning: Psalm 118; Isaiah 19:19-25; Romans 15:5-13  
Not every story Jesus tells contains a lesson in itself.  One story may be set beside another, showing the difference between its subject matter and the Way of Jesus.  Isn’t this the case with the story about the violence of a tyrannical ruler who slaughters those who oppose him (genocide)? Compare this with the humility of Jesus who, in the next story, rides into Jerusalem on a colt.  Disciples of Jesus follow a very different kind of king.  Sometimes, we have missed this comparison, but the Gospel is saying: Choose … what kind of ruler do you want?

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